Different Types of Rehabilitation Therapy

Therapy is as diverse as the needs of a patient. Depending on the ailment of the patient, specialized help is often required. However, regardless of the severity or type of treatment a patient needs, most types fall into a few different categories that are easy to understand. In general, there are two different types of rehabilitation therapy: inpatient and outpatient. Within these two categories, doctors and therapists will also target the patient’s body or mind for physiological or psychological healing. Regardless of the ailment, the process of moving from a hospital bed, to inpatient, then eventually outpatient treatment is an important transition to the overall recuperation of a patient.

Inpatient Therapy

During the initial visit to the hospital, a patient will receive immediate procedures to pull them back from the brink of danger. Depending on the intensity of the problem, a hospital stay after treatment can range from a couple days to a week or more. However, just because a person has been treated and released by a hospital does not mean they are suddenly well again. After crisis treatment, patients are often weakened and need time to rebuild mental and physical strength. Often, hospitals will move stable patients into facilities dedicated to continuing the arduous healing process.

Sometimes these facilities are attached directly to a hospital in a dedicated wing. This is ideal as the inpatient facility is often completely independent and does not take up hospital resources but are close enough for any immediate needs. Other times they will be close by, enabling family members and doctors with easy access for visits and checkups. Inpatient treatment is almost as rigorous as the immediate rehabilitation doctors and nurses offer in hospitals. Once the patient has recovered enough, they are moved to an outpatient facility.

Outpatient Therapy

The next step in the recovery puzzle is outpatient therapy. During this integral process, the patient is finally able to go home. However, they are not yet fully recovered. Outpatient care acts as a reduced contact continuation of inpatient care. Essentially, the work of the inpatient rehabilitation center is handed off to an equally capable facility, usually dedicated to outpatient type care. Very similar to a general doctor’s office, patients make appointments for their continued care. They then head to the centers to receive care and make it part of their continued life moving forward. This process helps patients re-enter society and adapt to it again after surviving their medical crisis. Outpatient centers form a safety net to continue encouraging healthy behavior and offer a break from the struggle of normal life demands.

Patients return to an outpatient facility a few times a week to continue the necessary work of their rehabilitation plan. In the case of drug rehabilitation services, like we offer here at Chapman House, patients are given the emotional and physical support they need close to home. Doors are open five days a week, and patients can receive six hours or more for their treatment. Quality care that can be relied on is crucial to a patient’s successful recovery.

Physical Therapy

Within the categories of inpatient and outpatient, there are two additional different types of rehabilitation therapy—physical therapy and neuropsychological therapy. Most people are familiar with physical therapy as many may have experienced it for any number of ailments. Even a simple strained ligament usually comes with an array of physical therapy instructions. The type of ailment that requires hospitalization is usually much more serious. Severe physical trauma, toxicity in the body brought on by drug addiction, and other types of medical emergencies usually result in continued physical therapy.

In the case of physical damage to the body, physical therapy works muscles around the damage very carefully. The goal is to strengthen muscle that has been lost during the recovery period. Muscle weakening is a common side effect to injuries, especially if a cast was involved in the initial healing process. In the case of drug rehabilitation, good health practices are important to help the body recover and continue to push toxins out efficiently.

Neuropsychological Therapy

When most of us think of psychological help, we probably picture the typical image of a psychologist that Hollywood has taught us. Neuropsychology is very different from the traditional counseling-based help that we are all familiar with. Rather than analyzing a patient’s life and decision-making skills, neuropsychology focuses on forging new synaptic paths in the brain. Where psychology focuses on past behavior, neuropsychology actively creates new behavior. This distinction makes the process of neuropsychological therapy very cutting edge and completely essential. During this type of rehabilitation, patients learn to override bad habits and thought processes with new ones.

In addition to giving patients a new set of tools to face life with, neuropsychological therapy is used for general healing. This includes memory strengthening and increasing cognitive functions. The latter is very important, especially in the case of physical trauma which can have mental side effects. It is also easy to see how crucial this type of rehabilitation is for patients recovering from addictive substances. Strengthening the mind to make correct choices is a vital step in overcoming the draw of chemical influence the next time the opportunity arises.

Regardless of the type of care needed, every patient deserves the best. In particular, the rehabilitation process after the initial hospital care can be confusing and intimidating. In summary, the different types of rehabilitation therapy are inpatient, outpatient, physical, and neuropsychological. First, patients receive almost constant care at a rehabilitation center where they stay. Usually these are attached directly to the hospitals without drawing on limited hospital resources. This type of treatment is called inpatient. Next, the patient goes home but returns to a nearby care facility for weekly treatment. It is important to choose a center that is both reliable and local.

Chapman House has been offering effective drug treatment programs in Orange County since 1978. We are dedicated to assisting families through the difficult period that comes after immediate care. Facilities like ours are often totally separate from hospitals, though they typically have a close association. Between inpatient and outpatient, an individual can expect a mix of neurophysiological and physical treatment. Where they go for treatment or for how long is up to everyone’s needs, and the type of care they receive will be tailored to the nature of their ailment.

Different Types of Rehabilitation Therapy

Different Types of Rehabilitation Therapy

Are you curious about what kind of recovery treatment typically follows a hospital visit? Discover the different types of rehabilitation therapy.

Therapy is as diverse as the needs of a patient. Depending on the ailment of the patient, specialized help is often required. However, regardless of the severity or type of treatment a patient needs, most types fall into a few different categories that are easy to understand. In general, there are two different types of rehabilitation therapy: inpatient and outpatient. Within these two categories, doctors and therapists will also target the patient’s body or mind for physiological or psychological healing. Regardless of the ailment, the process of moving from a hospital bed, to inpatient, then eventually outpatient treatment is an important transition to the overall recuperation of a patient.

Inpatient Therapy

During the initial visit to the hospital, a patient will receive immediate procedures to pull them back from the brink of danger. Depending on the intensity of the problem, a hospital stay after treatment can range from a couple days to a week or more. However, just because a person has been treated and released by a hospital does not mean they are suddenly well again. After crisis treatment, patients are often weakened and need time to rebuild mental and physical strength. Often, hospitals will move stable patients into facilities dedicated to continuing the arduous healing process.

Sometimes these facilities are attached directly to a hospital in a dedicated wing. This is ideal as the inpatient facility is often completely independent and does not take up hospital resources but are close enough for any immediate needs. Other times they will be close by, enabling family members and doctors with easy access for visits and checkups. Inpatient treatment is almost as rigorous as the immediate rehabilitation doctors and nurses offer in hospitals. Once the patient has recovered enough, they are moved to an outpatient facility.

Outpatient Therapy

The next step in the recovery puzzle is outpatient therapy. During this integral process, the patient is finally able to go home. However, they are not yet fully recovered. Outpatient care acts as a reduced contact continuation of inpatient care. Essentially, the work of the inpatient rehabilitation center is handed off to an equally capable facility, usually dedicated to outpatient type care. Very similar to a general doctor’s office, patients make appointments for their continued care. They then head to the centers to receive care and make it part of their continued life moving forward. This process helps patients re-enter society and adapt to it again after surviving their medical crisis. Outpatient centers form a safety net to continue encouraging healthy behavior and offer a break from the struggle of normal life demands.

Patients return to an outpatient facility a few times a week to continue the necessary work of their rehabilitation plan. In the case of drug rehabilitation services, like we offer here at Chapman House, patients are given the emotional and physical support they need close to home. Doors are open five days a week, and patients can receive six hours or more for their treatment. Quality care that can be relied on is crucial to a patient’s successful recovery.

Physical Therapy

Within the categories of inpatient and outpatient, there are two additional different types of rehabilitation therapy—physical therapy and neuropsychological therapy. Most people are familiar with physical therapy as many may have experienced it for any number of ailments. Even a simple strained ligament usually comes with an array of physical therapy instructions. The type of ailment that requires hospitalization is usually much more serious. Severe physical trauma, toxicity in the body brought on by drug addiction, and other types of medical emergencies usually result in continued physical therapy.

In the case of physical damage to the body, physical therapy works muscles around the damage very carefully. The goal is to strengthen muscle that has been lost during the recovery period. Muscle weakening is a common side effect to injuries, especially if a cast was involved in the initial healing process. In the case of drug rehabilitation, good health practices are important to help the body recover and continue to push toxins out efficiently.

Neuropsychological Therapy

When most of us think of psychological help, we probably picture the typical image of a psychologist that Hollywood has taught us. Neuropsychology is very different from the traditional counseling-based help that we are all familiar with. Rather than analyzing a patient’s life and decision-making skills, neuropsychology focuses on forging new synaptic paths in the brain. Where psychology focuses on past behavior, neuropsychology actively creates new behavior. This distinction makes the process of neuropsychological therapy very cutting edge and completely essential. During this type of rehabilitation, patients learn to override bad habits and thought processes with new ones.

In addition to giving patients a new set of tools to face life with, neuropsychological therapy is used for general healing. This includes memory strengthening and increasing cognitive functions. The latter is very important, especially in the case of physical trauma which can have mental side effects. It is also easy to see how crucial this type of rehabilitation is for patients recovering from addictive substances. Strengthening the mind to make correct choices is a vital step in overcoming the draw of chemical influence the next time the opportunity arises.

Regardless of the type of care needed, every patient deserves the best. In particular, the rehabilitation process after the initial hospital care can be confusing and intimidating. In summary, the different types of rehabilitation therapy are inpatient, outpatient, physical, and neuropsychological. First, patients receive almost constant care at a rehabilitation center where they stay. Usually these are attached directly to the hospitals without drawing on limited hospital resources. This type of treatment is called inpatient. Next, the patient goes home but returns to a nearby care facility for weekly treatment. It is important to choose a center that is both reliable and local.

Chapman House has been offering effective drug treatment programs in Orange County since 1978. We are dedicated to assisting families through the difficult period that comes after immediate care. Facilities like ours are often totally separate from hospitals, though they typically have a close association. Between inpatient and outpatient, an individual can expect a mix of neurophysiological and physical treatment. Where they go for treatment or for how long is up to everyone’s needs, and the type of care they receive will be tailored to the nature of their ailment.

Different Types of Rehabilitation Therapy
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